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Glendale, AZ

Glendale, AZ

Parks & Recreation
Engaging residents and visitors in diverse opportunities to live, invest and play in the community

Parks & Recreation
5970 W. Brown St.
Glendale AZ  85302
623-930-2820

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CAPRA
Glendale Parks and Recreation is Nationally Accredited.
CAPRA provides quality assurance and quality improvement of accredited park and recreation agencies throughout the United States. CAPRA is the only national accreditation of park and recreation agencies, and is a valuable measure of an agency’s overall quality of operation, management, and service to the community.
 
Parks and Recreation - Master Plan
Levels of Service

Introduction
This section presents information about existing levels of park and recreation services in Glendale and proposes new guidelines for levels of service to be achieved by 2005 based on population projections and service gaps. In addition, this section presents models for the development of new park facilities.

Levels of Service

Several strategies may be used to assess needs for facilities and programs. One method is to compare supply of facilities and programs against demand. If the demand outnumbers the supply, there?s a shortage of facilities or programs. If demand is less than supply, there is excess capacity and no immediate need for additional facilities or programs.

One technique that has proven effective and easy to understand is developing guidelines for the community. The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) 1996 guidelines encourage communities to develop guidelines that reflect the values of the community. Thus, communities around the United States have developed recreation guidelines that serve as benchmarks for service. Guidelines are generally based on population and density. Before guidelines can be established, the community first agrees on the number of facilities or resources (such as acreage) that are desirable. An example guideline for baseball diamonds is one ballfield per 5,000 people.

Service area analysis may also be developed. This analysis helps to determine the ease of access to park and recreation facilities and programs. Where guidelines are normally presented in tabular form, a service analysis is developed from population estimates or projections. This method evaluates equity access, that is, how far users are from given parks, recreation facilities or a program service. Access is illustrated through mapping. If a community decides, for example, that all citizens ought to have a community pool located within two miles of their residence, service area maps can easily show which area of the city might be underserved with pools.

The following pages discuss the various models and guidelines for facilities, recreation services, and parks that have been identified by NRPA guidelines.

Models for Facilities

This section will discuss future facilities that may be appropriate for Glendale. Models are typical facility types that are currently being built in other communities in the region and nation. Wherever possible, partnership and collaboration with schools are desirable to take advantage of economies of scale concerning land acquisition, parking, and perhaps the construction of other features.

Multi-generation Recreation Centers Model (service radius 3 - 5 miles)

The size of the facility is not as important as the service radius, travel time, and the population contained within the service area. The guideline for size typically equates to one square foot per person targeted to be served by the center.

Today recreation centers are designed to serve all demographic groups in one setting. These include preschool, grade school, middle school, high school, single adults, young families, extended families, and older adults. Designated spaces for older adults and teens are usual components of these facilities. These facilities range from 50,000 square feet up to 100,000 square feet. These facilities can generate income to offset operational costs as they serve large population areas rather than neighborhood specific areas.

Due to the population diversity they serve, recreation centers have the flexibility to contain the following amenities:

  • Gyms
  • Indoor walking tracks
  • Game rooms
  • Tutorial spaces
  • Meeting rooms
  • Indoor or outdoor aquatic spaces
  • Cardiovascular and free weight fitness rooms
  • Aerobic/dance rooms
  • Art or performing art spaces
  • Kid fit and preschool areas
  • Climbing walls
  • Locker rooms
  • Sauna and steam areas
  • Adequate storage space
  • Offices
  • Community gathering spaces
  • Concession or restaurant spaces

Family Aquatic Centers (service radius 5 miles)

Warm water pools are typically the most desirable aquatic amenity and drive programming decisions for outdoor and/or indoor aquatic facilities. Bather capacity minimums are 450 people for indoor pools and 1,200 people for outdoor pools. These facilities can generate income to help offset operational costs. They typically include a minimum of three separate pools, with the following amenities:

  • Zero-depth entry
  • In-water playgrounds
  • Water slides
  • Learn-to-swim areas
  • Lazy rivers
  • Resistant water areas
  • Therapeutic pools
  • Lap swim areas
  • Water polo and basketball areas
  • Deep water
  • Picnic and birthday party areas
  • Concessions
  • Restrooms
  • Zoned to accommodate targeted groups

Special Use Parks and Facilities

Special Use Parks and Facilities are created to serve targeted groups or special interest groups in a certain type of recreation category. These facilities can be focused to the neighborhood or the city as a whole. Examples of these facilities include dog parks, community gardens, golf courses, downtown event parks, parks for the disabled, walking parks, zoos, or botanical gardens. These special use parks and facilities can be very costly if not designed and managed correctly. They typically have a wide demographic appeal and need to be operated with different criteria than a neighborhood or community park. The city has incorporated many of these special use parks and the community has appreciated them.

Ballfield Complexes (service radius 10 miles)

Today, ballfield complexes are designed for baseball, softball, football, and soccer in 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 16 size field complexes. These facilities can be high revenue producers because of the special tournaments they can host. Economic value to the city is enhanced from this form of tourism with an increase in the sales of hotel rooms, food and other entertainment establishments within the city.

Softball complexes for adults and youth are usually designed in 4, 5, 6, 8 or 10 field complexes. These type of sports complexes include amenities such as ball diamond lights, parking, restrooms, concessions, batting cages, picnic areas, irrigated fields, scoreboards, quality sound systems, covered dugouts, good quality turf and covered play areas for children.

Baseball and football complexes are targeted to youth ages 6 ? 18 and include the same amenities and design as softball complexes.

Soccer complexes are typically designed in 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 16 field complexes that can serve all levels of players. The complexes include field lights, concessions, warm-up areas, irrigation, picnic areas, playgrounds, parking, restrooms, and fields that can easily be changed to reduce wear. The complexes range in size from 15 to 40 acres.

Small and Neighborhood Parks

Neighborhood parks range from less than an acre to 10 acres in size and include a picnic area, playground, outdoor courts for basketball or tennis, in-line skating or walking paths, no restrooms, limited parking, low level lighting, and practice areas for baseball, softball, or soccer. Neighborhood parks generally serve a population residing within a one-mile radius of the park.

Community Parks

Community parks are generally 10 to 50 acres and contain active and passive spaces. Active and passive spaces could include lighted game field complexes, indoor and outdoor recreation centers and pools, walking paths, picnic areas, playgrounds, tennis courts, special event areas, ponds, entertainment areas, concessions, restrooms, natural areas, a nature center, gardens, and fountains. A special attraction like a dog park, spray fountains, skateboard park or horticulture center could also be added. Community parks generally serve the population residing in a one to three-mile radius around the park.

Regional and Urban Parks

Regional parks are major destination parks to most urban centers and are 50 to 200 acres in size. They provide a high balance of active and passive spaces and can incorporate special event activities. Regional parks serve a population base living within five or more miles of the park. The city will need to add about 127 acres of Regional and Urban Parkland to meet its proposed guidelines for the year 2005.

Desert Conservation Parks

The city needs to play an important role in the protection of lands with significant natural features, such as critical wildlife or plant habitat, rock outcroppings. Often such lands are appropriate for use as undeveloped open space. Desert Conservation Parks are important features of the park system and need to be developed by the city as a way of protecting important natural resources. These parks are generally 50 acres or larger in size. The city will need to add about 250 acres of Desert Conservation Parkland to meet its guideline by the year 2005.

Linear Parks and Open Space (size varies)

Linear open space serves as major connection opportunities and provide for diverse recreational amenities. In many cases, they are drainage washes, flood control systems or canals. Depending on the width and length of the open space corridor, the service areas can range from city-wide to neighborhoods.

Demographic Analysis

Specific characteristics of Glendale?s population need to be analyzed and understood prior to establishing park models and guidelines. Glendale?s resident demographics will have an effect on demands for recreation programs, facilities and open space. Recognition of demographic characteristics for age (times of use and types of activities), income (ability to pay for services and access to facilities) and location in city (proximity to facilities and parks) are analyzed to develop customized parks and recreation guidelines that best fit the needs of Glendale residents. Demographic analysis and key findings are provided in the Community Needs section.

Summary Guidelines and Levels of Service

Desirable Park Size

Park Type Current Average Size Current City Guidelines Proposed City Guidelines
Neighborhood Parks 5.0 acres Up to 10 acres 5 - 10 acres
Community Parks 15.4 acres 10 - 25 acres Over 10 acres
to 50 acres
Regional Parks 61.0 acres 25 - 200 acres Over 50 acres
to 200 acres
Desert Conservation Parks 1185 acres 250 - 1,000 acres 50+ acres
Linear Parks Varies Varies Varies


Parkland to Population Ratio (acres per 1,000 population)

Park Type Current City Guidelines Proposed City Guidelines
Neighborhood Parks 1.0/1,000 1.0/1,000
Community Parks .5/1,000 1.0/1,000
Regional Parks 7.0/1,000 1.5/1,000
Conservation Parks 7.0/1,000
5.0/1,000


Parkland needed to meet Proposed Guidelines (acres)

Park Type Demand based on Current Guidelines Current Supply 2005 Demand based on Proposed Guidelines Additional acreage needed by 2005
Neighborhood Parks 205 219.5 241 21.5
Community Parks 102.5 100.6 241 140.4
Regional Parks 1435 201.25 361.5 160.25
Conservation Parks N/A 1,185 1207 22



Levels of Service for Glendale Facilities

The following paragraphs identify the current number of facilities provided in the City of Glendale, the proposed guideline or "benchmark" and the projected number of facilities that will be needed in 2005 (based upon population projections of 241,397.) The benchmark ratios for the number of facilities were derived from National Recreation and Parks Association guidelines.

Recreation Centers Summary

The size and range of services delivered by recreation facilities vary widely. The maps show gaps in service areas in northeast, northwest and southwest Glendale. Population growth and development in these areas indicate that the greatest need is for a community or recreation center. Recreation centers can service between 10,000 and 100,000 people, depending on the size and the amenities offered within the facility.

Generally, there are three sizes of recreation centers that are considered for communities: neighborhood centers; community centers; and regional centers. Centers can service about a three-mile radius and will service one person for every foot of space. The number of people the center will support will be dependent on the types and amount of amenities offered in the center. Because of the features that are offered in the facility, the neighborhood center facilities cannot support the population base that community and regional centers might.. Facilities that consist of only a gym, for example, cannot be expected to deliver services to a population base much larger than 5,000 to 10,000 residents. Currently, the City of Glendale has what would be considered five neighborhood centers. Many groups and individuals have expressed a need for more diverse space than what a neighborhood center can provide. Seniors, teens and people with disabilities also need more space.

Level of Service for Neighborhood Centers

  • Number of Existing Neighborhood Centers: 5
  • Guideline: 1 center/10,000 population
  • Number of New Neighborhood Centers Needed by 2005: 0 (needs will be met by the multi-generation centers and renovation of existing centers).
  • Capital Cost Estimate: $1.0 to 1.2 million per facility ($100-$120 per square foot x 10,000 sq. ft. facility minimum)

Level of Service for Multi-Generation Regional Centers

  • Number of Existing Multi-Generation Regional Centers: 0
  • Guideline: 1 center/50,000 population to 1 center/75,000 population
  • Number of New Centers Needed by 2005: 3 to 5
  • Capital Cost Estimate: $8.25 to $11.25 million per facility ($165 per square foot x 50,000 to 75,000 sq. ft. facility minimum)

Aquatic Facilities Summary

The need for renovation and repairs of existing pools has been mentioned in other sections of the report, especially considering the gaps that exist in the northern portions of the city. There are existing facilities located at the community college and a high school that are in the central part of the city that currently attempt to serve the people in the north end of the community. Cooperative agreements with these schools need to continue. However, new development of pools needs to occur in the northern parts of the city. A planned north area pool will be included in Foothills Park Phase II design. Growth in west Glendale will necessitate pools in those areas as well.

New facilities need to be designed to accommodate larger numbers of users than the existing pools. Two types of aquatic facilities can be designed: community pools and signature aquatic centers. These aquatic facilities can be built with three types of configurations to meet the needs of the users. The first type of pool is called a flat-water pool. These pools are of traditional design and consist of lane lines for competition and lap swimming and are typically designed with several depths of water to accommodate several swimmer types. All Glendale pools fit this description for pool design. Community pools are defined as competitive pools with supporting play features and a water surface of approximately 10,000 square feet. Signature aquatic centers focus on interactive play features and contain approximately 20,000 square feet of water surface.

There is a good opportunity to develop signature facilities that can create a unique experience while generating positive economic impact to the surrounding communities through new jobs and potential cottage businesses. There are potential gaps in the northern portions of the city. If existing pools are renovated, they need to be expanded with more pool amenities to accommodate more use and to serve a larger geographical area.

Level of Service for Aquatic Facilities

  • Number of Existing Aquatic Facilities: 7
  • Guideline: 1 facility/20,000 population
  • Number of New Facilities Needed by 2005: 5
  • Capital Cost Estimate: $5.0 million per new aquatic facility; $1.0-$1.5 million each for rehabilitating existing facilities

Athletic Fields Summary

Soccer, Baseball, Softball, Football

Interest in several sports is growing nationally and the demands for fields are becoming increasingly competitive. The supply of the current outdoor athletic fields does not meet the demand for use in Glendale. Some of the factors that lend themselves to this conclusion include: multiple use of existing fields among several sports and levels of participants; adults are sharing game fields with youth and are without softball in the summer; girls' softball shares fields with baseball; national growth and levels of participation locally in soccer and girls' softball has increased. Based on national guidelines, there is a need for more baseball, soccer and softball fields. It appears that football field needs are being accommodated by the local high schools.

When possible, fields need to be created in clusters of 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 per site. This helps to reduce supervision costs, offers more opportunity for revenues through food sales and is beneficial at times when the city wants to attract major athletic events to foster local tourism.

Level of Service for Athletic Fields

  • Number of Existing Athletic Fields: 64
  • Guideline: 1 field/10,500 population softball, 1 field/12,000 population baseball, 1 field/6,000 population soccer, 1 field/10,000 population football
  • Number of New Fields Needed by 2005: 18 baseball, and 13 soccer/football
  • Capital Cost Estimate: $250,000 to $350,000 per field (could be less depending upon how many fields are in one location).

Basketball Courts Summary

Glendale is behind the national guideline for basketball courts. Increasing the number of basketball courts and many of the other recreational opportunities for drop-in games are known to have positive affects within neighborhoods. There have been suggested links between having such opportunities available and reducing youth crime and other at-risk behaviors.

Considering a strong desire on the part of the public to provide facilities for teens, basketball could be one of those sources to help meet that expressed need. Outdoor basketball courts are typically tied to existing playgrounds. When trying to meet the guideline for outdoor court need, it would be acceptable to include basketball courts with the existing parks that are without courts. In other communities, these facilities are being developed in half-court configurations to reduce the amount of space required to meet the need.

There is a need to increase the availability of indoor basketball space as well. Given the size of the community and the shortage of indoor courts, it is necessary to add twelve courts to the system. There are opportunities for developing additional signature facilities for the community through indoor and outdoor-supervised basketball complexes. It would be natural to include these improvements with a community center or teen room. Developments like these would not be land intensive and would also help to meet the need as expressed by the community.

Level of Service for Basketball Courts

  • Number of Existing Basketball Courts: 44 outdoor, 8 indoor
  • Guideline: 1 court/3,000 population outdoor, 1 court/20,000 population indoor
  • Number of New Courts Needed by 2005: 36 outdoor, 4 indoor
  • Capital Cost Estimate: $225,000 per facility outdoor, include in Community Centers for indoor

Playground Facilities Summary

Glendale has old and dated playground equipment in many of the older parks. They offer little opportunity for children to develop their creativity and most are not handicapped accessible. Equipment is limited to basic play structures, slides, swings, and spring toys. The themes are simple in design. Most have playing surfaces that are comprised of sand.

Playgrounds serve a multitude of demographic groups, children under ten, teens, adults, seniors and families. They require more preventative maintenance and can last anywhere from ten to fifteen years. While most playgrounds are built for children under the age of ten, recent experiments with teenaged playgrounds have been citing success. Teen playgrounds could be included in planning of other teen activities. Playgrounds can also be developed for the entire family including seniors that can provide a valuable family experience with grandparents.

Size and scale of playgrounds need to be considered as a part of the design process. Size and scale are important considerations, depending on the size of park. For instance, smaller configurations would be built in mini and neighborhood parks and larger playgrounds would be placed in community and regional parks. If the playground is undersized for the park, overuse will result. Overuse will present problems such as undesired appearance of space surrounding the playground, ground maintenance control, and unsatisfactory play experiences by the user due to an inability to access the play equipment.

Level of Service for Neighborhood Playgrounds

  • Number of Existing Neighborhood Playgrounds: 58
  • Guideline: 1 playground/3,000 population
  • Number of New Playgrounds Needed by 2005: 22
  • Capital Cost Estimate: $35,000 to $50,000

Level of Service for Regional Playgrounds

  • Number of Existing Regional Playgrounds: 2
  • Guideline: 1 playground/30,000 population
  • Number of New Regional Playgrounds Needed by 2005: 6
  • Capital Cost Estimate: $100,000 to $150,000

Golf Course Summary

Glendale is behind the national guideline for golf courses. There is a need to increase the number of golf courses in areas where growth is occurring. Golf doesn?t have to be created by the city, however, if it is determined not to develop city-managed golf courses, it will be necessary for the city to work with developers to improve the ratio of courses to population.

Level of Service for Golf Courses

  • Number of Existing Golf Courses: 2 nine-hole, 1 semi-private 18-hole
  • Guideline: 1 course/75,000 population
  • Number of New Golf Courses Needed by 2005: 1 18-hole course
  • Capital Cost Estimate: $6,000,000 to $10,000,000 per facility

The following Recreation Facility Guidelines and Needs table has been prepared to identify the quantity of each facility in Glendale by zone and recommend the needed facilities based on population projections for the year 2004. The zone boundaries are:

Zone 1 = City of Glendale Property north of Bell Road

Zone 2 = City of Glendale Property north of Olive Avenue and south of Bell Road

Zone 3 = City of Glendale Property north of Grand Avenue and south of Olive Avenue

Zone 4 = City of Glendale Property west of Grand Avenue

Refer to the Planning Zone map provided in the Appendix of this Master Plan.

Recreation Facility Guidelines and Needs

Facility Existing
City-Owned
Recommended Guideline Total Additional Needed for Population Estimate of 241,397 by Year 2005
Softball fields 36 (14 Lit) 1 / 10,500 0
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

7 (3 Lit)

17 (8 Lit)

4 (2 Lit)

8 (1 Lit)

 
Baseball fields 1 (0 Lit) 1/ 12,000 20
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

0

0

1

 
Soccer field 27 (5 Lit) 1 / 6,000 13
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

2 (1 Lit)

16 (4 Lit)

7 (0 Lit)

2 (0 Lit)

 
Football field 0
1 / 10,000 24 (Joint use with soccer)
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

0

0

0

 
Outdoor Basketball court 44 (31 Lit) 1 / 3,000 36
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

10 (4 Lit)

16 (10 Lit)

5 (5 Lit)

13 (12 Lit)

 
Indoor Gymnasium 0 1 / 20,000 4
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

0

0

0

 
Tennis court 36 (36 Lit) 1 / 5,000 12
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

2 (2 Lit)

26 (26 Lit)

4 (4 Lit)

4 (4 Lit)

 
Neighborhood Playground 58 1 / 3,000 22
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

13

19

10

16

 
Regional Playground 0 1 / 30,000 6
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

0

0

0

 
Shelters/Ramada's (Reservable) 34 1 / 6,000 3 (Consider shade for each park)
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

15

9

5

5

 
Aquatic Facilities 7 1 / 20,000 5
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

3

2

2

 
Neighborhood Center 5 1 / 10,000 0
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

2

2

1

 
Multi-Generation Regional Center 0 1 / 50,000-75,000 3-5
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

0

0

0

 
Golf Courses 2 (9-hole) 1 / 75,000 1 (18-Hole Public)
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

0

1

1

 
Racquetball Courts 48 (48 Lit)
1 / 10,000 +24

Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

4 (4 Lit)

22 (22 Lit)

8 (8 Lit)

14 (14 Lit)

 
Sand Volleyball 27 (16 Lit) 1 / 7,500 5
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

9 (6 Lit)

10 (5 Lit)

1 (1 Lit)

7 (4 Lit)

 
Turf/Hard Court Volleyball 9 (5 Lit)

1 / 7,500

 
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

5 (1 Lit)

2 (2 Lit)

2 (2 Lit)

 
In-Line Hockey 1 1 / 50,000 4
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

0

0

1

 
Skate Parks 0 1 / 50,000 5 (1 under design)
Zone 1 (pop. 39,050)

Zone 2 (pop. 49,932)

Zone 3 (pop. 85,174)

Zone 4 (pop. 28,515)

0

0

0

0

 

 



 

 

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