City of Glendale, AZ - Click here to go to the city home page

Glendale 24 x 7 Logo
Bullet point image to link for latest city news Latest City News
Bullet point image to link for latest city news En Español
Facebook Logo Twitter Logo YouTube logo Flickr Logo   Follow Your Money
Glendale, AZ
Glendale, AZ - Departments Glendale, AZ Glendale, AZ - Services Glendale, AZ - Glendale, AZ - City Officials Glendale, AZ Glendale, AZ - Residents Glendale, AZ Glendale, AZ - Visitors Glendale, AZ Glendale, AZ - Businesses Glendale, AZ Glendale, AZ - Online Services Glendale, AZ Glendale, AZ - Important Updates Glendale, AZ Glendale, AZ - Home Page
Glendale, AZ

Glendale, AZ

Parks & Recreation
Engaging residents and visitors in diverse opportunities to live, invest and play in the community

Parks & Recreation
5970 W. Brown St.
Glendale AZ  85302
623-930-2820

Quick Links
 
Search
CAPRA
Glendale Parks and Recreation is Nationally Accredited.
CAPRA provides quality assurance and quality improvement of accredited park and recreation agencies throughout the United States. CAPRA is the only national accreditation of park and recreation agencies, and is a valuable measure of an agency’s overall quality of operation, management, and service to the community.
 
Parks and Recreation - Master Plan
Organizational Support and Vision

Issue

The Park and Recreation Department needs to position themselves at a higher level of recognition in the community. More than two-thirds of those surveyed (69%) indicated that they or other members of their household use recreation programs and facilities provided by organizations other than the City of Glendale. The three most frequently listed organizations were churches (26%), private health clubs (24%), and local schools (19%). An improved and more recognizable location can improve the community recognition of the services the Park and Recreation Department provides.

Action Strategy #24

Position the Parks and Recreation Department within the city structure where it has the greatest opportunity to succeed and demonstrates to the community that the department has met their expectations for livability.

Organizational Support and Vision Recommendation:

Reposition the department to more closely align to other community driven departments in the city.

Action Items

  • Evaluate what other departmental service providers may be duplicating with City Parks and Recreation (juvenile department, transportation, neighborhood commissions, etc.). Identify how each department will work closer together.
    Timeline: Y3 - Q3, Responsible Staff: Director
    Cost: Staff research
    Revenue Potential: Reduction in costs for duplication of services
  • Evaluate other departments' willingness to partner with Parks and Recreation.
    Timeline: Y3 - Q4, Responsible Staff: Director
    Cost: Staff research
    Revenue Potential: Not measurable in terms of saving or revenue production at this time.
  • Identify which department is in a better position to provide services.
    Timeline: Y3 - Q4, Responsible Staff: Director
    Cost: Staff research
    Revenue Potential: Not measurable in terms of saving or revenue production at this time.
  • Prepare inventory of services.
    Timeline: Y3 - Q4, Responsible Staff: Director
    Cost: Staff research
    Revenue Potential: Not measurable in terms of saving or revenue production at this time.


Organizational Support and Vision Recommendation:

Geographically locate Parks and Recreation offices and maintenance yards in a more productive and efficient operating location.

Action Items

  • Propose to have district offices program space included in future community centers at north and west.
    Timeline: Y3 - Q4, Responsible Staff: Director
    Cost: Cost is equal to 600 square foot of space per person.
    Revenue Potential: Not measurable in terms of revenue. However, staff will be located in the community to improve access to them.
  • Work with Economic Development office to locate potential office space.
    Timeline: Y4 - Q1, Responsible Staff: Director
    Cost: Staff research
    Revenue Potential: Decentralized offices and access to the department will equate to easier access to registration by the user. Easier access may equate to higher program revenues.


Organizational Support and Vision Recommendation:

Review possibility of moving Parks and Recreation Department closer to Community Services. Market the value of positioning Parks and Recreation services in correlation with the city?s Community Services activities.

Action Items

  • Identify resources that can be shared with other Community Services Departments, and clarify value of inventory those services.
    Timeline: Y3 - Q4, Responsible Staff: Director
    Cost: Staff research
    Revenue Potential: Revenue in the cost savings of not duplicating purchases of resources.
  • Determine process to propose changes with City Management Team.
    Timeline: Y4 - Q1, Responsible Staff: Director
    Cost: Staff research
    Revenue Potential: This step is not equated into revenue potential.
    Organizational Structure Recommendation:

Overview

Currently, the Glendale Parks and Recreation Department organizational structure is designed into three management districts. The districts operate in a fairly independent manner with each superintendent having a parks supervisor, a recreation supervisor (or two) with a project coordinator available to two superintendents. This management approach can have excellent results if each of the superintendents have exceptional communication skills and can think and respond to what is right for the city first versus what is right for their respective districts that they manage. Sometimes this organizational design forces competition between superintendents and staff and doesn?t allow for each division to work together in the best interest of the city. To alleviate problems associated with style of management, the leaders of the Parks and Recreation Department have started a team management approach to city-wide services that will force each superintendent to join forces in the delivery of common services that affect each of their respective districts that they manage.

For example, in the Youth Development Team they have established four areas of concentration. These areas include G.R.A.S.P., teen programs, Glendale Community Center, and intramural sports. A specific mission was established for each team and common goals with measurable outcomes were developed. All levels of staff are included in creating the mission and the goal-setting process and were expected to develop the action strategies related to the areas they represent. This example will work well if guidelines are established in terms of delivering an approach to city-wide issues. Good leadership, communication and tracking of results are needed to push through the barriers that keep the issues from being dealt with and resolved. Team management requires very strict guidelines to be followed on how the department will follow policies that affect the delivery of the service.

Organizational Structure Recommendation:

The current approach to team management for youth services needs to be duplicated as it applies to the delivery of safety resources, trails, game field maintenance, city-wide sports, contract maintenance, after- school programs and life skill programs. This will force each district staff to meet the guidelines established by the team and implement them in their respective districts. The teams need to continue to listen to the public on what and how they would like the programs and services to be delivered and hold each team coordinator and staff responsible for compliance.

The city will need to develop some training efforts for staff. These efforts will establish performance measures that are measurable for how effective they were in meeting the needs of the community as outlined in this Master Plan. The recommended organizational chart will allow for team management to exist and prosper. The director of the Department will need to control any efforts by a superintendent to operate outside of the boundaries established by the team.

Proposed Organizational Structure Chart:

org chart

 

 

Glendale, AZ - Welcome
Glendale, AZ
Contact Us   |   Brochures   |   History of Glendale   |   How to Get Around Glendale   |   Links   |   Press Room   |   Policies
© 2013 City of Glendale, Arizona