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Feral Cat Information

The city of Glendale provides the following information as a resource to citizens in dealing with feral cat issues. The city of Glendale does not handle feral cat colonies, however, Maricopa County does offer some resources to residents in dealing with feral cats.

Information from Maricopa County Animal Control and Care (MCACC):

In examining effective feral cat reduction/elimination programs across the country, MCACC has concluded that the most effective solution is a comprehensive program that includes:

  • Community education about spay/neuter and keeping tame cats indoors.
  • Adoption of tame strays into new homes.
  • Trap, Neuter, Return (TNR) to managed colonies for feral cats.
    Through TNR, cats are humanely trapped and sterilized. Feral, therefore unadoptable, cats are
    placed back into the environment in which they were living. Volunteer caretakers then provide food,
    water, and clean, unobtrusive shelters for the cats. Eventually, through natural attrition, the colony dies out. Any stray or tame, adoptable cats found in the colony are removed and adopted into homes.
  • CLICK HERE to download detailed information on feral cats from MCACC (PDF).
  • CLICK HERE to visit the MCACC website for more feral cat information.

What is the difference between a stray cat and a feral cat?

A stray cat is an unowned animal that you see in your neighborhood that is friendly and enjoys human contact.

A feral cat has had little or no human contact during its natural life.
Some people consider feral cats to be nuisances because they can exhibit behavior such as marking their territory, howling at night, fighting, and destroying property. Because feral cats are usually not spayed or neutered, they reproduce at an alarming rate, which results in more cat problems and public health concerns.

Spay and Neuter Resources:


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